If there’s anything that “everyone knows,” it’s that the Jews rejected Jesus of Nazareth (Hebrew name: Yeshua). In fact, it would be hard to find anyone – Jew, Christian, or other – to deny this. And yet, believe it or not, the Gospel texts that give the story of this man’s life tell us exactly the opposite: that Yeshua/Jesus was wildly popular among the Jews of his day, so much so that even the government was afraid to take any action against him!

People may disagree, of course, about whether the Gospels are fact, fiction, or something in between. Yet any reader of these historical texts should at the very least try to understand what story they are telling. Somehow, for almost 2,000 years, that story has been grossly distorted beyond recognition. Since people are still reading (and misreading) the Gospels, maybe we should try to set the record straight, as best we can.

The first-century accounts of the life of Yeshua/Jesus state in dozens of places that large crowds of Jews sought him out and followed him. We read that in Galilee, Judea, and elsewhere, “the crowds were amazed by his teaching” (Matt. 7:28); “they kept coming to him from everywhere” (Mark 1:45); “again crowds of people came to him” (Mark 10:1); “news about him spread through the whole countryside” (Luke 4:14); “great crowds were traveling with him” (Luke 14:25); “even many of the rulers believed in him” (John 12:42); and so forth. These are just examples; similar statements keep appearing continuously all throughout the Gospels.

Naturally, not everyone in Israel liked Yeshua/Jesus, especially some within the Roman-sponsored government. Matthew says about these ruling officials that “they wanted to seize him but feared the crowds, which viewed him as a prophet” (21:46). Later “they plotted to seize and kill him by trickery but said, ‘Not during the [Passover] feast, lest the people riot’” (26:4-5). These verses about opponents emphasize even further the extraordinary popularity of Yeshua/Jesus among the general Jewish population. Parallel reports in Mark (11:18, 12:12, 14:1-2) and Luke (19:47-48, 20:19, 21:37-22:2) say the same thing.

The group of conspirators did carry out its “plot by trickery,” arresting the teacher in the middle of the night and quickly prevailing on the Roman authorities to sentence him to crucifixion. When the Jews of Jerusalem heard what was going on, “the crowds gathered to see… and returned home beating their breasts” in misery (Luke 23:48). Luke goes on to say that the whole Jewish population of the city was devastated by what had befallen this “prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people” (24:18-21). So even though the supposed Jewish rejection of Jesus has long played a major role in antisemitism, the Gospels actually report that most of the Jewish people loved Yeshua/Jesus!

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91 COMMENTS

  1. Awesome explanation and truly a blessing.

    What would be a good guess/and or estimation of the number of followers Yeshua and His Talmidim feed with a few fish and some bread.

    Estimate, Men, Women and Children?

    Be Blessed

    • Thank you, Roberto! I’m not sure exactly what you are asking. Do you mean in the story given in Matthew 14? If so, I don’t have any better guess than anyone else. 🙂

    • Dear Roberto, since Matthew 14:21 tells us that those who were fed were about five thousand men, besides women and children, I have often heard that a reasonable estimate for the whole crowd – of both sexes and all ages – would have been about three times as many, that is 15,000. If similar calculations hold good for the later Feeding of the Four Thousand, there would have been 12,000 present on the second occasion. One thing is certain: we are dealing with round numbers – probably to the nearest thousand or the nearest five hundred – for the men.

  2. While I find your article well written and mostly correct, I do have an exception to your final conclusion; that most Jews loved Yeshua. It states that Yeshua “came to His own, and those who were His own did not receive Him” John 1:11. I would surmise that while a lot of people were His admirers, the majority either rejected Him or were neutral. The proof is seen even today in the fact that the majority of the Jewish people still haven’t accepted Him and His claims. Also the work of Jewish evangelism still poses a great challenge.

    • Thank you for the comment, James! In context, the statement in John is not referring to the Jewish people, but to the “world” or “universe” (κόσμος; kosmos) and the things and people in it. See especially verses 3 and 10 (just before 11, which you cite). Our site also has another article that explains some additional reasons why the traditional Christian interpretation of John 1:11 is mistaken: https://weekly.israelbiblecenter.com/jews-reject-jesus/ . As for Jewish attitudes toward Jesus and Christianity today, that is a complex topic, but certainly different from the question of what picture these first-century Jewish writings mean to paint.

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      • with all due respect you are wrong,as yeshua says,he only came to the lost sheep of Israel, by blood,the seed of jacob,also,he says,no prophet is given honor in his home town.

        • Thanks for commenting, Shane. I must confess, I’m not sure exactly what your point is. If Yeshua came only to Israel, surely that emphasizes the point that all these crowds following him consisted of Jews. Regarding the prophet proverb, what then about all the other towns? Moreover, John/Yokh. 4:44-45 updates us: “For Jesus/Yeshua himself had testified that a prophet has no honor in his own hometown. But when he came to Galilee, the Galileans welcomed him, having seen all that he had done in Jerusalem at the feast. For they too had gone to the feast.” More could be said.

        • If we deny that the Jewish people rejected Jesus we create many problems of interpretation. * Why did the people cry “Crucify Him” just five days after they wanted to make Him King on Palm Sunday? * If these weren’t Jews then who were they? * Why is it stated in John 10…? 31 “The Jews had again brought some rocks to stone Jesus to death. 32 Jesus replied to them, “I’ve shown you
          many good things that come from the Father. For which of these good things do you want to stone me to death?” *John 10:22-42

          • Thank you for the comment, Mark. These issues are largely addressed in the article and the comments.
            1. Most of the people mentioned throughout the Gospels are Jews. Hence, one creates many more problems of interpretation by adopting the view that “the Jewish people rejected Jesus,” due to the dozens of passages that say otherwise.
            2. On the term Ἰουδαῖοι (Ioudaioi) in the book of John, which should usually not be translated as “the Jews” (but generally is), please see my comments below in response to Jan, Tim, and Ettienne.

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          • 3. On the different “crowds” described in the crucifixion story and their different reactions to the arrest and execution of Jesus/Yeshua, see for example: Matt. 21:46, 26:4-5, 26:47; Luke 22:52, 23:48, 24:18-21; John 18:3; etc. As the article says, “Naturally, not everyone in Israel liked Yeshua/Jesus, especially some within the Roman-sponsored government”; and, at the same time, “the Gospels actually report that most of the Jewish people loved Yeshua/Jesus.”

        • In response to Shane and Mark Rogers I strongly recommend that you read the most valuable book written by the Martin Luther of our time Dr Mark Kinzer: “Jerusalem, the People of Israel, and Their Messiah”
          Many thanks for the excellent work you are doing Yeshaya. May Adonai bless you and keep you…..

    • Maybe it was just an example of Realpolitik. ‘It’s nothing personal, just business,’ as they say in the movies before pulling a dirty act. High priests did not hate Him but were afraid that He could cause a popular revolt ending in a catastrophe like the Bar Kobcha uprising a few decades later.

    • I agree James. Jews were attracted to Jesus because of curiosity. Many became convinced he was the Messiah and that he would rid Israel of Rome but when Jesus didn’t do that they turned on him. Jews then became the first persecutors of the Christians and they still hate Jesus.

      • Shalom, Paul. I think you may be uninformed about many Jews who don’t hate Jesus at all. I’d humbly suggest to reconsider instead of slandering an entire nation/people! 🙂

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    • The Truth is always in the minority.
      In Yeshua’s first pull where He did miracles,He had a great following which he agreed followed him bcoz of the bread,but when He came to His third pull-the opening of the Word,mysteries revealed(unless you eat my body&drink my blood…)they all left the predestined.

  3. Shalom Dr. Gruber I thought I would let you that I am confused here. Dr. Eli also has this same title and it seems to be talking about the same thing. He has about 49 comments on his and I am your first. Sometimes it gets confusing and the titles that are by two different persons. Yes I think that they are both interesting. But it can get confusing sometimes.

    • Thanks for pointing this out, Sandra. At IBC we have a variety of different perspectives and sometimes like to write posts coming from multiple angles (even on the same topic). That said, Dr. Eli’s article is not covering the same ground, but is focused on a particular passage in John. However, perhaps we should consider modifying the titles.

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  4. Dr. Yeshaya, I was referring to the so called, “feeding the 5000”.

    I’m showing an example of Yeshuas popularity and that He was in fact loved by many.

    Blessings

  5. I don’t know why people are so anti-Semitic. Jesus predicted that he would be crucified long before it happened because it was God’s plan all along. Otherwise people wouldn’t believe in him if it didn’t happen because they’ve never seen a resurrection before. It says in the Bible that Israel is God’s chosen people, so if you go against them , you go against God. I guarantee you won’t win.

    • Bill, the reason why people are so anti-semitic is because they’ve been influenced to be that way. You have to remember that the first anti-semitic group was the pagans which have been in some clash or fight with Israel before the exodus from Egypt and while it was claiming the Promised Land. History shows that’s been the case ever since; to cast doubt and create a stigma against God’s chosen people which has even affected Christian interpretations of the Bible. Don’t forget that when the pagans first accepted and converted to Christianity, they syncretized their faith with pagan beliefs.

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    • Bill Skibinski That has repeated many times yet Re they’ve never seen a resurrection There were a large number of family and Friends who in the week previously who saw Lazarus raised after 4 days. I believe that news traveled far and fast. But not near so fast as today

    • Thank you for commenting, Jan. None of these passages contradict the article in the slightest — although sometimes faulty translations and traditional theologies do make it seem that way. In our courses, we get into these issues in detail. Very briefly: 1) In John, the word Ἰουδαῖοι (Ioudaioi) “Judeans, Jews” only rarely refers to the Jewish people as a whole, but very frequently to the Jerusalem politico-religious elite. 2) In Revelation, the group mentioned are specifically called “not Jews,” and here “synagogue” is a misleading, tendentious, inconsistent translation. Does your version have “synagogue” in James/Jacob 2:2 or Hebrews 10:25? Why (not)?

  6. The Gospels show Jesus’ great popularity, but not Jewish willingness to follow him (John 6:66). The Resurrection made that generation accountable (Matt 12:39, 16:4). That generation would either follow Jesus and receive the Promises or be judged (Acts 2:39-40, 3:19-21) as Malachi 4:5-6 said (Luke 1:17; Matt 11:14, 17:12). “Many ten thousands among the Jews have believed, and they are all zealous adherents of the law” (Act 21:20). Hebrews called Jewish believers to follow not law and tradition but Jesus. The issue was not heaven or hell for believers, but the Kingdom or the curse for that generation (Heb 2:5).

    • Thank you for commenting, Tim! I would interpret some of these passages differently. IBC courses do discuss such issues in detail. For now, please note that in John the word Ἰουδαῖοι (Ioudaioi) “Judeans, Jews” only rarely refers to the Jewish people as a whole, but very frequently to the Jerusalem politico-religious elite. You seem to view the description “zealous for the Torah/Law/Instruction” (Acts 21:20) as a negative, but it was certainly intended as highly positive praise in the original first-century context. I’m not exactly certain of the relevance of Heb. 2:5 here (?).

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      • Heb 2:5 gives the topic “the world to come of which we are speaking.” The “so great salvation” is the coming of the Kingdom. It is an eschatological book. Jesus must be heard as the final word from God (Heb 1:2, Deuteronomy 18:15-19). All the “Jesus is better” than Moses, Levitical sacrifices, priesthood, temple was to move them from the Old to the New Covenant (Hebrews 7:11-19). The Law was “weak and useless” for bringing anyone to God’s presence. Dead works. Jesus could bring them in, while the Law held them out of intimate access. They couldn’t use both.

        • Thank you, Tim. You raise a number of points that would be great to argue over sometime, but that are beyond the scope of the discussion here. This article deals only with the picture presented in the Gospels. In our courses we do get into some of the other passages you mentioned, attempting to interpret them from within their proper first-century context. You can also see some of my approach to concepts like “Law” and “works” in these Jewish-Greek texts by reading the discussions at:
          https://weekly.israelbiblecenter.com/possible-rejoice-law/
          https://weekly.israelbiblecenter.com/faith-biblical-idea/
          https://weekly.israelbiblecenter.com/do-paul-and-james-disagree-about-faith/

          • God can’t reject His promises or His people (Leviticus 26:44-45, Jeremiah 31:37). Israel must lead the way to eternal blessing (Zech 8:20-23). But the Promised Kingdom will come only when Israel will “do justice and righteousness” (Genesis 18:19, Isaiah 60:21, Jeremiah 3:14-19). James writes to Jewish believers when the Judge of their works is standing at the door (James 5:7-9, 2 Pet 3:10-14). Faith alone doesn’t pass that test. Paul is writing in Galatians about the way of individual salvation. Faith alone in Christ alone is enough. Adding works cuts off from grace. Faith and righteousness required for the Kingdom.

          • Without meaning to be flippant: You are having a theological discussion, while I am having a textual discussion. 🙂 (And never the twain shall meet?) I don’t disagree with the first part of your response. But what is actually meant by the word “faith”? In Biblical Hebrew, faith(fulness) simply cannot be separated from what one does (=”works”). I believe there is good evidence to suggest that Jewish-Greek writers shared this conception in their use of pistis, at least to a very significant extent. It is the later translations (and Christian theologies) that make it seem not so.

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      • I would agree that Jacob and the Jerusalem Christian hierarchy at the time saw zealousness for the Law as commendable (cf. Acts15:21). Paul went along with sacrifices and rituals for the sake of peace. But sitting in jail for four years talking to God about his beloved people and their hope, he saw that the Law system was replaced by better in Jesus (Hebrews 10:1-14). They couldn’t use both a dying earthly priesthood system and Jesus’ eternal priesthood. Going back to the old ways leads to a curse, not blessing (Hebrews 6:4-8). Thanks for your time.

        • Thanks for the conversation, Tim. The purpose of these articles is to stimulate thought, discussion, and exploration. Very briefly: I (and several recent scholars) would disagree with your characterization of Paul/Saul. More and more, people are recognizing how devoted he was to Torah. However, by and large this is a recent development in interpretation; and again it is a big topic that we can’t get into much here. However, I think you will see these themes popping up in various future discussions on our site as well if you stay tuned!

          • If faith always includes faithfulness, why is the centurion more faithful than any in Israel (Matthew 8:10). Is the Syro-Phoenician’s daughter healed because of the mother’s faithfulness to Torah (15:28)? Is it faithfulness like a mustard seed that brings miraculous answers to prayer? If by standard definition faith includes works, both James’ and Paul’s discussions seem unnecessary labored. I was surprised to see that John never uses Pistis, (as well as repentance). Seems then that faithfulness is not an issue in the personal salvation he is promoting. Shalom. May we meet in the hereafter as friends.

          • We must keep in mind that none of these authors used the English word “faith.” The first-century Jewish-Greek writers used pistis. Why? Because the Septuagint translation had used that as a stand-in for Biblical Hebrew emunah. The Greek word by itself did not carry the implications of the Hebrew; hence Jacob/James and Shaul/Paul have to explain for their Greek readers. Philo of Alexandria does the same. A good example of the Hebrew meaning: 2Kings 12:15, 22:7. Emunah (“faithfulness, reliability”) is not necessarily connected specifically to the Mosaic Torah; this is Shaul/Paul’s whole point. Abraham lived before the Mosaic Torah…

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          • …Very interesting point about the word choices of John/Yokhanan, whose language is markedly different from many other “NT” writings (the use of Ioudaioi being one prominent example). However, this author does use the verb form πιστεύω (pisteuō) frequently. (And I might question your broader inference.) Regarding Matt. 17:20, well, compare Jacob/James 5:16 and Habakkuk 2:4 (as described in my other article). This may give food for thought! You raise wide-ranging points that can only be discussed over time, so please continue to read and comment. Amen to your wish — perhaps we will even meet one day sooner! 🙂

  7. There seems to be a shift from a nation to individuals though. How do you navigate Matthew 23:37-39 and Matthew 24? Also Daniel 8:24-27 where it has the last week Messianic prophecy of Yeshua’s baptism 27AD, his death in 31AD in the middle of the week which caused the sacrifices to cease, and then 34AD with the stoning of Stephen and the gospel being spread further (Acts 7/8:1)—all completing the 70 week prophecy (day equals a year principle) warnig the nation 490 years from the final command to restore and rebuild Jerusalem in 457BC in Ezra 7:13-26 to repent.

    • Thank you for commenting, Dana! 1) Matt. 23-24 seems to support the idea of a Jerusalem politico-religious elite that tries to get rid of dissidents, no matter how popular. Note that the contemporary Essene community excoriated the “corrupt” Jerusalem elite in much harsher terms! (See also my comments in response to Jan, Tim, and Ettienne about the book of John.) 2) My article discusses the picture painted by the first-century Jewish-Greek Gospels. I think it would be too much to get into various interpretations of the earlier books of Daniel and Ezra here.

  8. Nothing could be further from the truth: “If there’s anything that ‘everyone knows,’ it’s that the Jews rejected Jesus of Nazareth (Hebrew name: Yeshua). In fact, it would be hard to find anyone – Jew, Christian, or other – to deny this.” Any “Christian” who is biblically literate – and there are thousands (many!) – understand that “the Jews” is a writer’s-description of a limited-in-size segment within the contemporary Jewish population. Using such a literary device is not helpful and creates ‘windmills’ for others to joust at! Respectfully.

    • Thank you for the comment, Matthew. I think you will find that the number of Christians (or Jews, or others!) who think “the Jews rejected Jesus” far, far surpasses the number who believe “the Jews did not reject Jesus.” I am glad to hear that there may be thousands in the latter category; however, both subjective experience and more objective study indicate that it is rare to find them (and there are literally billions in the other category!). By using quotation marks around “everyone knows,” I intend to place this statement into the category of what is generally assumed uncritically. Probably most things that “everyone knows” are false.

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  9. I half agree with your article.
    Jesus was very popular among the Jewish people for a time until His “Eat my Flesh and drink my Blood” Sermon (Jn 6:66-67).
    Many Jews rejected Him and even tried to stone Him (Jn 8:48; 52, 57, 59; 10:31,).
    Jesus had to withdraw from Judea because of this opposition (Jn 11:7-8).
    Some leaders believed and did not openly confess it (Jn 12:42-43).
    The Pharisees and Chief Priests plotted to kill Him although many of the common people believed. (Jn 11:45-54).
    The Chief priest rejected His Kingship and chose Caesar instead (Jn 19:15).

    • Thank you for commenting, Ettienne. I notice that all your citations are from the book of John (Yokhanan in Hebrew). However, in this particular first-century Jewish-Greek writing, the word Ἰουδαῖοι (Ioudaioi) “Judeans, Jews” only rarely refers to the Jewish people as a whole, but very frequently to the Jerusalem politico-religious elite. In our courses, we discuss this issue in detail.

  10. To my mind, the night arrest of Jesus explains it all. Whom would you arrest in such secrecy? Someone hated everybody wanted to see hanged? Or instead, steal away someone loved, so nobody would know anything about it until it was too late?

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  11. Yes my doctrine incorrectly teaches that the Jews rejected Jesus. What comes to mind is Psalm 118:22 (the stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone.) I see that the Psalmist was speaking about opening the gates of righteousness. I am not sure what the stone that the builders rejected has to do with a gate or entering a gate. Interesting to reconsider the topic

    • Thank you for commenting, Kat. A large gate (such as a city gate, common in ancient times) would likely have a cornerstone or foundation stone. Perhaps this is the connection?

  12. Thank you, thank you, thank you! Even the children were crying out in the Temple “Praise God for the Son of David” further infuriating the leaders.

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  13. I’ve seen no mention in the comments about the Pharisees. In my studies, I’ve understood that their vanity caused them to resent Jesus Christ and seek to squelch his ministry. The Jewish population’s love as a whole posed a threat to their selfish rule.

    • Todd, we need to read the New Testament very carefully on matters like this! Yes, some Pharisees – perhaps even many – did oppose Yeshua/Jesus , but others became loyal supporters. Look at Nicodemus, for example. I am not sure if Joseph of Arimathea was a Pharisee, but Rabbi Shaul of Tarsus, although initially bitterly opposed to Yeshua, later became one of His best known and most effective followers. After all, the Pharisees agreed with Yeshua on the Resuurection and the reality of angels and spirits: the Sadducees, who rejected these teachings, also rejected Yeshua – apparently unanimously!

      • Thank you for these points, Todd and Seathrún! I would add that even many Sadducees apparently joined the Yeshua/Jesus movement in the first century. Acts 6:7 says, “The number of disciples in Jerusalem multiplied exceedingly, and a great multitude of the priests were listening/living according to the way of faithfulness.” The Sadducees are associated with the priestly class (Temple servitors).

  14. The members of the Sanhedrin hated Him the most because they were threatened by His Presence and his popularity. They were the ones who instigated the most against Yeshua. They loved the manmade traditions while Jesus was leading the masses back to the real meaning of the Law.

  15. Thank you for your willingness to discuss the negatively associated with the law Dr. Y. I was reached with the Ten Commandments. What I can and did with law was very limited and different from what God could and did with the law in my life. This is why I see the law as positive.

    • Thank you, Kat! I think it is important to keep in mind that in Hebrew “Torah” does not actually mean “Law” but rather something more like “Instruction” or “Teaching.” Just the word “Law” itself (as an English translation) often seems to mislead people very significantly about the nature of the Torah!

      • Yes I have heard the Torah referred to as “Instruction”. This is also a problematic translation for me in English because “instruction” sounds like a very weak suggestion. Lawlessness is not necessarily a disregard of the law, it’s a type of worship in our own image (standard). I think Matt 5:47 says it well “what are you doing more than others”. I never knew how important language was until I stumbled upon this site. Keep up the good work.

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  16. IMO, the Jewish leaders were lapdogs for Rome, the ones adhering to Yahweh had been killed by Rome to insure the loyalty of all Jewish leaders to Ceasar

    • Thank you for the comment. This issue is a very important one for understanding the context. I think there were a variety of competing political interests. Also, the Roman Empire certainly did kill a lot of Jews (many of them by crucifixion). But at the same time, it seems from the accounts we have that there were still many living who sought to adhere to YHWH (the God of Israel).

  17. You are correct in saying that he was popular amongst the Jew’s. The problem was not his popularity, but the fact that they only perceived him to be a prophet and not the son of the Father, the prophesied Messiah.

    • Thank you for commenting, Evelyn. I’m not sure who you mean by “they.” According to the Gospels and other texts, Jews of the first century had a wide range of views about Yeshua: many viewed him as a prophet of God; large numbers viewed him as a prophet and Messiah (Jewish-Greek christos); some opposed him altogether. I didn’t deal with the book of Acts in this article; however, that continuation of the Gospel stories (specifically Luke) asserts that large numbers of Jews regarded Yeshua/Jesus as Messiah/Christos in subsequent decades as well. (Otherwise there never could have been any Gentile Christianity either!)

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  18. The real question gets lost in asking did the Jews love Jesus, or Yshua. The problem is they didn’t accept him as the messiah. This isn’t anti Semitic it is merely a fact that as a whole, Jews then and now don’t recognize Jesus as the only begotten son of God. The Christ savior.

    • Thank you for commenting, Patrick. Please see my response to Evelyn above. Why you would expect all Jews (or any other national group) to all adopt the same view? Keep in mind also that Gentiles (non-Jews) didn’t have any concept of the Messiah (=”Christ”) in their own native cultures! In the first-century context, this is a purely Jewish idea. Large numbers of Jews assigned this title to Yeshua/Jesus; according to historical evidence, such Jewish groups continued to exist for several centuries — some would even say all the way until today. Eventually, and for various reasons (mostly political), Gentile Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism became dominant, but this should certainly not distort our picture of the first century (or even the second, third, etc.).

      • You say “Why would you expect all Jews (or any other national group) to accept the same view?” I would, in fact, expect it less of Jews who often tend to be very independent thinkers! Even some Rabbis say, “where you have ten Jews, you will find eleven opinions.” Blessings!

  19. Thank you so much for the authentic information you share. Am just perplexed was Yeshua executed on a straight pole or a t-shaped stake..And the lineage of Yeshua’ what happened.. ( even through Jacob his brother) is there still continuity in regards to the House of David? Toda

    • Thank you for the comment, Nicholas. As far as I understand it, the Romans reportedly used many different forms of crosses in crucifixions, so it is hard to know which form would have been used in this case. (Someone else may know more about this subject.) Regarding the second point: I don’t know about Yeshua/Jesus’ family in particular, but there would have been many other descendants of the House of David in the first century — and presumably even until today.

    • We are very happy that you’ve joined our discussion forum. Would you believe that these articles are only a taste of what Israel Bible Center has to offer? We also provide comprehensive teaching on a variety of biblical, historical, and cultural topics. You might begin with The Name of God or Exploring Jewish Interpretation. You’ll be amazed at the Jewish world that awaits you. Don’t delay another minute: enroll now!

      • I have heard that many – perhaps all – Jewish genealogical records were destroyed in the Temple in 70 AD/CE. If this is true, probably none of the false Messiahs that have arisen since then could prove Davidic descent! How many of them were born in Bethlehem – another requirement?

  20. This was very well explained. Thank you. When I have been told the Jews rejected Jesus, I simply cannot grasp why GOD would reject HIS own Chosen People. HE chose them, made them HIS, made a covenant with them. HIS Word cannot return to HIM void, so how can HE reject HIMSELF or part of HIMSELF? HE can’t^ HE disciplines, but HE cannot reject what HE made HIS. GOD Bless Israel and Her People^ Thank you for this.

  21. The colorful discussions your article has drawn simply means that you are treading on a controversial hotly-contested proposition for centuries, “the jews rejected Jesus Christ”. Hitler (who was a Roman Catholic) and the Nazis, exterminated Jews because they bring plagues for being “Christ-killers”! (Most) Jews still believe that Yeshua was a false prophet who misled the people of Israel. Up to this time, they are still waiting for the coming of God’s Messiah.

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  22. I am curious what the word “reject” means in Hebrew? I found several Bible translations using the word reject (Exodus 20:5, 23:23; Lev 26:11, Lev 26:15) and the word seems to mean hate (love less?), not reject. It seems to be associated with the commandments? My doctrine (not me) was law-free so I am confused about what it means to reject Jesus. I notice that John 14:15 associates love and the commandments with another Comforter (leader?).

    • Kat, this is very interesting. I quickly looked up those four verses and found a typical situation that often results when dealing with translations. Those four verses actually use four different verbs in Hebrew! This yet again drives home the point about how a translation can never be the same as the original (and because of things like this, most translations are not really suitable for word studies). Here are the approximate English equivalents of the Hebrew verbs used in those passages [note that Hebrew/English verse numbers sometimes differ]:
      Ex 20:4/5 hate
      Ex 23:23 annihilate
      Lev 26:11 abhor
      Lev 26:15 refuse/despise & abhor

  23. A general comment: Are these comments from the original Hebrew gospels or from the Hebrew translations of the Greek gospels. The Greeks translated according to their philosophies, then the Hebrew translators altered the Hebrew to suit the Greek version. Using the English versions please read John 1:19 and 24.

    • Thanks for the question, Dirk. We don’t have any known versions of “original” Hebrew gospels about Yeshua/Jesus. Unless otherwise noted, our commentary on this site will usually be based on the Jewish-Greek texts that exist in many manuscripts and were passed down for centuries in the Christian tradition.
      Could you perhaps clarify your question about John 1? Those are interesting verses, for sure! — but I’m not certain what you are asking.

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  24. I ran out of space in my comment. I think the confusion between this article and the one that seems similar, ‘Did the Jews Kill Jesus’, is that they have different messages. There are many mistakes in the English versions as well as in the Afrikaans Bibles.

  25. We are very happy that you’ve joined our discussion forum. Would you believe that these articles are only a taste of what Israel Bible Center has to offer? We also provide comprehensive teaching on a variety of biblical, historical, and cultural topics. You might begin with The Name of God or Exploring Jewish Interpretation. You’ll be amazed at the Jewish world that awaits you. Don’t delay another minute: enroll now!

  26. UM POST, BASTANTE ESCLARECEDOR. SEMPRE ACREDITEI QUE A MAIORIA DOS ISRAELITAS, AMAVAM A JESUS, POIS SEMPRE LI NOS EVANGELHOS QUE, GRANDES MULTIDÕES O SEGUIAM, MAS UMA MINORIA O DESPREZAVA, PORQUE IA CONTRA TUDO O QUE ELES ERAM E FAZIAM, POR ISSO PROCURAVAM OCASIÃO PARA O MATÁ – LO.

  27. Jesus’ prayer in Matthew 11:25 says all:”I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children.” The generality of Jews (little children) accepted Jesus while the Pharisees and Saducees (wise and leaned) rejected Him).

  28. Rejecting Jesus is more to do with Him as saviour of the world and the departure from Judaism and traditions to putting Jesus ahead of all other believes.The crowds following him were after miracles only but didnot accept Him . Also departure from human effort to please God .

  29. In my studies I have concluded as you that much of the Jewish population were enthralled by Yeshua and the miracles he performed and many thought He would lead them out of captivity. When that did not happen some turned on Him and almost all even His disciples became disheartened.

  30. Continued. After the resurrection and then the filling of the Holy Spirit they went first to Jews and many accepted Yeshua. Then they went to the Gentiles. As to His own received Him not the scripture refers to His home town not all of the Jewish community.

  31. Bill Skibinski – As long as we have an adversary, there will be irrational hatred towards anything that is of God. The effort will always be to destroy what God has, and that effort has been/will be extended towards God’s precious people, the Jews, and towards true followers of Christ (as is the severe case even now throughout the world). Having read the end of God’s word, all will be addressed and every wrong will be righted, but think how many times Satan has tried to stamp out God’s beautiful people, in Egygt, in the book of Esther, under Herod, and the historic tragedies ever since. Irrational acts of hatred point to the liar and murderer who is the enemy of God and God’s people.

  32. Most (not all) of the Jewish people loved Yeshua but feared the Romans that’s why they did not fight for Him or maybe most Jews (not all) wanted Jesus to be crucified because they did not get what they want from Him-to deliver Israel from Roman oppression/occupation.

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