Those of you, who know me, know that I am not someone who decries the very ideal translation, or believes that all translations are wrong and unuseful. Far from it. I believe that translation work, into vernacular languages of various people groups, is in fact extremely important.

I am also persuaded that no matter how good any given translation is and no matter by what group of people or individual/s it is accomplished, it is still an interpretation of the original text we call the Word of God and not the Word of God itself. Most people think that because the majority of Bible translators are committed to God individuals they would never introduce anything of “their own” into the text of translation. But the truth be told that it is impossible to do, no matter who does it. Translation is in some way an act of interpretation of the original Scriptures, because knowing original languages does give you the ability to know exactly what the original words and sentences mean, instead they give the ability to determine the range of possible meanings.

My point is simple: Everyone involved in translation of the Bible has to make translation decisions every time when various meaning possibilities present themselves in the text. That happens more often then you realize. That, in and of itself, should not discourage you or scare you in anyway, instead it should encourage you to learn how to use the simple tools such as Interlinear Bible, Dictionaries, perhaps, or Bible study software, to be able to see for yourself what other translation options are there in the text (sometimes you will be amazed and puzzled as to why the translators opted out of better ways to say it, and at other times you will see their logic quite clearly).

Another thing is important to state at the start. Sometimes the issue is not that the translators have followed “a wrong” trail, pursuing an erroneous trajectory of meaning, but that something that is said in Hebrew sometimes simply cannot be translated into any other languages clearly. So by learning how to read in Hebrew and use Bible Study tools you will be able to go into the original Hebrew text and discover for yourself the rich treasure that lies beneath translation. You will be able in some way to experience and feel the language in which these sacred texts were once penned down.

BEGIN YOUR JOURNEY OF DISCOVERY

111 COMMENTS

  1. Perhaps I am dating myself by saying this … I am 75 years of age. And back when I was a college student, studying for an Industrial Engineering degree and preparing for the ministry, I learned that “translation” and “interpretation” are essentially the same thing … in that they both involve the conversion of the words of one language into the words of another. And that translation pertains to written words, and interpretaton pertains to spoken words. To this day I am somewhat offended when scholars attempt to “interpret” that which has been translated. What say you?

      • I am of the firm conviction that Scripture interprets itself because God never contradicts Himself.
        If we search every Scripture passage concerning any topic, the correct interpretation of truth will emerge. Try it and find this true.

        • It is a conviction that is based on nothing but human (protestant) tradition. I like it too, but where does the Scripture sets forth such a principle?

          • I agree that Scripture does not have the phrase that “Scripture interprets itself”.
            Of course, Scripture also does not have the phrase ascribing to Jesus, saying, “I am God, worship Me”.
            But I am in agreement with Glen, that God does not change, and He does not contradict Himself. So, is it not reasonable to interpret something that God said at a certain point of time, with what He said at other times, aka, “Scripture interprets itself” ?
            If this is reasonable, does it matter if it originates from Protestant sources?

          • And nevertheless, there are still occasional passages (about a certain singular topic) that contradict each other (apparently or absolutely). Even though the Protestant model works well and often, it crumbles here. A hallmark example of a “contradiction” would be Prov.26:4-5. Should you answer a fool in his folly or not?

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          • Prov 26:4-5. Fascinating set of verses. You just made me think about them again and how I have applied them over time. As the word also says, Rightly dividing the word. Some fools are ignorant fools. And so Mashiakh said, Forgive them Father FOR THEY KNOW NOT WHAT THEY DO. But sometimes fools that think they are smart act with deceit and conceit. And the Holy Spirit makes naked their motivations. Then, it may be of value to them to put them in their place!

          • Would it be safe to say that Scripture CLARIFIES itself. OR SOMETIMES I HAVE DISCOVERED THAT IF YOU KEEP ON READING (EXAMPLE: REVELATION), THE BOOK ACTUALLY GIVES THE ANSWER TO QUESTIONS ASKED BEFORE OR SITUATIONS OCCURRING BEFORE THE ANSWER.

          • Translation is of necessity interpretation, whether it is Hebrew to English or Latin to English. It is extremely difficult to put oneself into the mindset of ancient peoples, so translation is always, as Dr. Eyzenberg says, going to be interpretation. We only hope to get close to the intended meaning.

        • Concerning Scripture interpreting itself I am convinced that one will have a clearer understanding of the text with persistent familiarity with the entire Biblical context. Therefore my goal is to have a Bible in a year Devotional plan, and encourage others to do the same. Led by the Holy Spirit

      • Interesting conversation re: translation & interpretation. How is it that most of the Pharisees & Scribes in the time of Jesus got scripture translation & interpretation so wrong by going against Jesus & yet the Word was in their language.

        • Jesus says that they were putting man-made traditions over the commands of God. That would certainly do it.

      • How about this:
        The Original Languages = That’s what it says.
        Interpretation = What a person thinks it means.
        Translation = That Interpretation written in paraphrase and/or a different language.

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        • Thanks for this. Here is an example from the Quran. Surah 4:157 speaks about the crucifixion. Is says, They killed him not nor crucified him. Then adds “walakin shubiha lahum”. Hebrew helps. “walakin” should be “w’al kayn”, meaning “and therefore”. And “lahum” means “to them”. But in the first authorized Saudi translation, “shubiha” was “so it was made to appear”. In a later widely distributed translation, we have “the resemblance of ‘Iesa (Jesus) was put over another man (and they killed that man)”! Clearly the latter is interpretation expressed in English….

        • Yet, when you look at the whole verse in the full context of a Quran that confirms the earlier revelations of the prophets of the Tanakh and called the disciples of Jesus “helpers of Allah”, you find the interpretation totally wrong! And therefore the translation just as wrong. Let’s take a wider look at the verse: 4:157. That they said (in boast), “We killed Christ Jesus the son of Mary, the Messenger of Allah.;- but they killed him not, nor crucified him,(663) but so it was made to appear to them, and those who differ therein are full of doubts,

        • Those who wanted Jesus dead were not the disciples but the leaders of the Jews. They are the ones who believed they had killed him dead, so to speak. They rejected the resurrection, which the next verse affirms. They are the ones being addressed by the Quran, not the followers of the disciples who had clearly witnessed both a crucifixion and a resurrection. Surah 19:33 tells us Jesus died before the resurrection, but didn’t say how he died. It didn’t have to. The witnesses of the NT had already done so.

        • I check the interlinear for Prov 26:4,5, and to me, the plain text seems fairly straightforward. I see what you mean by the apparent contradiction. But I believe the “contradiction” is only interpretative. 26:4 instructs us not to argue in like manner with a fool, because doing so makes us fools, just like the fool we are arguing with. 26:5 instructs us to try to correct the fool, which is what we should be doing, should we not? Are not all of us fools before God opens our eyes?

          • ‘When the plain sense of Scripture makes good sense, seek no other sense’ is very helpful. The ‘sense of Scripture’ though is not ALWAYS ‘plain’ given cultural, linguistic and other realities. This’s where a working knowledge of original languages and bible backgrounds becomes a must.

        • Here’s this example. Matthew 5:3 “Blessed [are] the poor in spirit: for theirs is
          the kingdom of heaven.” I’d always wondered what “poor in spirit” meant, for I rather expected the true believers to be “rich in spirit”. Just recently, after many years of bible study, I thought to look at the interlinear. And the verse should have read “the poor one that is in spirit!” And this is what James said in 2:5, Yahweh has chosen “the poor, rich in faith …” How I long for literal translations with the interpretation of the translator most minimal!

    • re: invetreptation v translation. I once read a “translation” of a Catholic;ic saint, which hallway through I began to think was a bit odd. To keep it short I found (through the translators own notes) that it left out many crucial things , words phrase etc, and reinterpreted them in a way that was essentially modern politically correct. I then read another translation (Spanish to English) written in the 1920’s that was a direct translation. The second was meaningful whereas the first was not because the writer decided which words or phrases were accurate or which may have been discreet digs at the hierarchy. The second, which had been vetted by not only the Carmelite Order to which this saint belonged, but by two additional scholars through the years. The Original words, not the politically correct version, was the better because it got the particular Saints thought s and words correctly. The Bibe , being a collection of centuries and millennia is different, but subject in some cases to the same problem; A particular translation might be incorrect because the “translators” might have an agenda’like Martin Luther or others who left out the Apochyrpha. Needless to say I have multiple editions so I can compare if needed.

  2. If we say that the Bible is the inspired Word of God, and the living Word, and in essence, the Holy Spirit wrote the Bible, can’t we trust that the Holy Spirit is in the translations, and that God is Sovereign in them? I am not hearing anything about the Holy Spirit’s role here.

    • Shalom, Kathleen. The role of the Holy Spirit is of utmost importance. Without the regenerative work of His (or Hers in Hebrew and Aramaic) no one can even see God’s Kingdom as a reality). So Holy Spirit is VERY IMPORTANT. Having said that, we know for a fact (100%) that translations do not perfectly communicate to us the original sense of God’s word in its original languages. NOW… the level to which they do, THEY TOO (the translations) can be referred to rightly as God’s Word as well. Holy Spirit promised to lead God’s people to All truth.

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      • I agree the words for Holy Spirit in Hebrew are feminine, that does not mean that the Holy Spirit is a female.
        This is an example of grammatical gender.

    • The ONE and ONLY TRUE God Almighty is The great “I AM” Lord” Holy Spirit Father Son, the UNITY of the TRINITY (spirit mind body) who came to earth in the FLESH Immanuel (God with us) as God’s only begotten Son Yeshua (God’s salvation) on a threefold mission on earth to redeem repenting BELIEVERS with MERCY GRACE FAITH and HOPE as TRUE respectful OBEDIENT believing followers of YESHUA Messiah Christ Jesus our mediator Lord saviour and master!

      • Do you realize that “Lord” is the translation of Baal (pagan god)?
        It is obvious that YHVH is not pronounced Lord. Would the Torah still be valid if the Name of YHVH had disappeared?
        The Holy Scripture does not support the Trinity.
        When there is no translation it must be transliterated. Such is the case of “the Ruach HaQodesh” (feminine) that has been rendered as Holy Spirit (masculine)

        • While what you’re saying is true, I don’t know of anyone that substitutes Ba’al for YHWH. The sages taught to say Adonai instead of YHWH. But if you wish to transliterate YHWH, then there are plenty of difficulties and controversies surrounding that alone.

        • We are glad that you are finding our articles enlightening. You’ve already started your path into Scripture, but there’s so much more that awaits you! Consider enrolling in our immersive online courses: Exodus and The New Testament or Leviticus and The New Testament. We guarantee that they will deepen your understanding of Scripture and enrich your faith experience.

          • Consider this concerning YHWH. The Talmud and certain Midrashim teach that the ineffable name YHWH is expressly attributed to the Messiah.* Also, all OT revelations of Messiah are interpretatively discerned. Scripture requires interpretation even if we wish otherwise.
            *Alfred Edersheim, Life & Times of Jesus the Messiah, pg 178

          • I agree 100% with Edersheim, my only concern is the interpretations that are disconnected from the Bible’s proper culture and context. They tend to cause more problems.

        • Jesus Himself several times clearly said “My FATHER” (=DEFINITELY not a female). In Greek, the Holy Spirit “Paraclete” is masculine; as also in John 14:26 “…He will teach you and remind you..”

        • I agree that a translation is touched by interpretation, directly or indirectly. The main objective, unless stated otherwise, is to put the scriptures into the known languages of men so that they can read the text for themselves. Is this risky? It depends upon intent.

    • The prophets wrote by the Holy Spirit. But does the Bible say anywhere that all translators have done so by the Holy Spirit? the translators are scholars who have been guided by the existing doctrines, particularly those post-Constantine’s attempts to abolish even the Judaism of Apostle Peter and Jewish Christians (Acts 21:20) by Roman church law.

    • Yakha, Of course the Holy Spirit “illuminated” the Prophets, the Apostles and the Fathers of the Church… all of them were God-fearing people, hence the God-inspired writings that they left us regarding the truth… “Are ALL prophets or teachers?” (or translators or exegetes?) NO, because God chooses who is.

    • I was wondering the same thing Kathleen. I’ve always thought we should set our own interpretations aside, reading the Bible to really know G-d and allowing His Holy Spirit to share with us what His words mean.

  3. My favorite for this subject is “You are Peter and upon this rock I will build My Church.” When I read the Greek I was surprised to see τεφχω, the word that I learned when I studied Greek was not used, but another word which also indicates to me the idea of dwelling in His Church. This gave me a completely new meaning to the passage. My Greek New Testament is still packed up, so I can’t give you the word that was used. Just a thought.

    • Thank you for joining the discussion, Michael, but I didn’t understand τεφχω or how it relates to Matthew 16:18.

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    • I’ve learnt so much from the provocations of this post. I just looked at the Greek interlinear of Matthew 16:18. It says, “… you are Peter, and upon THIS, the rock, will I build the assembly …” Now, the translators have presumed that “THIS” refers to Peter. But verses 16 and 17 force another, if not different, interpretation. He had asked, Who do men say that I am? Peter replied, The Messiah, the Son of the living God. Then he says, … upon THIS will I build my assembly…. “THIS” could certainly mean “THIS ANSWER”! “THIS KNOWLEDGE IS THE ROCK!”

      • “This” (the rock) implies the rock-solid foundation of the Church upon Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God.

    • Are you saying your translation was on this rock ‘I will (put) place’ my church instead of “I will build.” (oikodomaso) ?

  4. Is there a particular English translation you would recommend as the closest to the original text. I have about 30 bibles in my collection. Interested in your favorite.

    • I use ESV mostly, but translations are just a tool. When your various translations seem to diverge at a certain verse, then you can know that there is something deeper that each translator had to make a tough translation decision.

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  5. Kathleen, you spoke my mind. I believe that in as much as we do not down play the knowledge and understanding of the original words used in scriptures we should also bear in mind that someone can know those original words and still miss the interpretation or the message that the Holy Spirit is conveying since those who wrote were inspired by Him. The scripture says that the letter killeth but the Spirit is life. Therefore to have knowledge of the letter without the Spirit will be equally misleading and dangerous. See also 2Peter 3 v 14 – 16.

  6. As a Biblical College teachers, I’ve had many discussion over translations. Love the article above. My simple response has been “God watches over His Word to perform it”. If this Word did not accurately represent Him, He would be under no obligation to back it up with demonstration. Enjoying you posts a lot. Love to learn.

  7. I have a minor in New Testament Greek.

    As I was taking my first course–baby Greek–in the language, I began to understand the problem of translation as interpretation. It is why I cannot possibly agree with the King James Only crowd, nor can I readily say that the translation I use is error- free though I believe it is one of the best. I am working to find the funds to take these courses, perhaps pursue an online course in Hebrew. Translation as interpretation is certainly a concern.

  8. I really do not understand, so please explain:
    How is it possible to learn to translate c 3000 years old scriptures when,
    I as a Dane, have difficulties to understand danish texts written just 400 years back.
    And have the same problem with c 400 years old English writings

    • There are so many early translations, commentaries and discussions of the New Testament, so understanding the vast majority of it is fairly straight forward. Also cross referencing with the Septuagint is a major player in interpretation. Only in various few places is the interpretation in question. The difference then is simply availability of related texts.

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      • I’m amused at your comment about waiting for a non-human translator. They have them all over the Internet with many languages. I have yet to find one that works! I do better with a good language to language dictionary.

        Bought your book. Can’t afford classes. Love your writing style.

  9. Dr. Eli, this article is really important. What is the real name of God in Hebrew and what us its collect translation in English?

    • Our Dr. Gruber wrote an article about how God’s name has a plethora of meanings. In short, most scholars agree that God’s name is Yahweh and that it comes from the verbal root “to be”. So God’s name mostly means “eternally existing/abiding.”

      • The original Greek Septuagint text says ΕΓΩ ΕΙΜΙ Ο ΩΝ which means “I am the One who (actually) is” – as opposed to us transient creations, who are not pre-eternal like the Creator… Thankyou Dr.Eli for your posts… I have already translated one of your articles into Greek!

  10. I believe most will agree that there is no “perfect” translation.
    I believe most will agree that it would be ideal if one can read and UNDERSTAND the original text.
    But,
    Is it likely that those who took a few semesters in Hebrew could really and accurately apprehend an ancient language?
    Is it not true that words are used and understood differently across time?
    So, even if one could read the original language, is he not also merely translating something written years ago?
    Pardon my ignorance, but is that not what the Rabbis are doing?

    • Accurate interpretation is not a black and white matter, it is a gray-scale. Some people do it worse and some do it better. Rabbis, by and large, pass along interpretations of other rabbis from antiquity and medieval times, for most of whom Hebrew is their mother tongue. No, not all of their interpretations will be inerrant, but they will be much better than any number of translations. The point is for us not to get dogmatic when our foundation is a possibly errant translation.

      • Your statement “not all of their interpretations will be inerrant” seems to prove my point – that even those mother tongue is Hebrew can err in their interpretation.

        So how would those whose mother tongue is not Hebrew fare? How would who merely learn how to read Hebrew fare?

        I can read Malay with no trouble whatsoever, but I would have great difficulty with Malay nuances.

  11. I am a KJV only believer because it is translated from Textus Receptus
    the most accurate translation of early scrolls, matches up with Dead Sea scrolls
    Some of the later translations are from questionable texts. Some of the translators believed in Darwin’s theories and changed vital words such
    As leaving phrase ‘blood of Jesus’ out of a verse

    I like these discussions.

    • The KJV New Testament was indeed translated from the Textus Receptus (TR), but beyond that, your post contains some misinformation. The TR isn’t a translation it is a tradition, it certainly isn’t “early,” and no NT manuscripts were found among the Dead Sea Scrolls. Darwinian thought certainly effected some Old Testament translations, like in the Living Bible, but I don’t see a connection to the NT translation.

  12. I have a King James Bible, given to me in 1979. I did not try to read it, but it went with me everywhere. I moved 17 times, through years of trials and tribulation before I opened the Book in 1990 to read it for the first time. After a few verses I closed the book. I could not understand the words. Perhaps He decided it was not my time yet. But, after earnest prayer a few weeks later I was able to read and understand those strange words… I still use my King James Bible for answers and strength.

    • God’s name is correctly called JEHOVAH in the King James Version & other versions too……. my favourite version being the NEW WORLD translation …… as our Lord’s Prayer says. “Our Father who art in Heaven, hallowed be thy name” ……. that name being JEHOVAH (see also EXODUS 6:3)

  13. I rest in knowing that God wanted the message of the Bible to go to all the tribes of the world. I don’t think He is worried about the process of the transliteration of the words or the translation of the meaning of the words, as long as those translating do their best.

    • I agree, praise God that Bibles are available to the whole world. But a problem invariably arises when two equally convicted believers on an issue become hostile towards each other when their convictions are actually based on a misunderstood text from different or even errant translations/interpretations. This is why, especially for anyone who teaches or pastors, getting the right interpretation the first time (by studying straight from the originals, or at least from multiple translations) can help bring much needed unity and love back into the Body of Messiah.

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  14. As a student of the KJV for more than 40 years, I discovered that there are indeed what I would call translation errors. The word hell is a good example. How is it that Sheol, Hades and Gehenna could have all been translated as simply hell? Hell has been understood to be a place of eternal torment but Sheol, Hades and Gehenna do not necessarily indicate eternal torment.

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    • Sheol is Hebrew for the place of darkness that the dead go; Hades was likewise the underworld in Greek mythology, and Gehenna was the valley below Jerusalem where “hellish” pagan rites of human sacrifices took place in olden times. The name is a metaphor for “horrific place”.

  15. Dr. Eli, I have been a diligent Bible translator for over 65 years. No truer words than that translation is interpretation. I would add that, reading the Greek and Hebrew texts, is also interpretation. It is oh so easy to read into the text. But as a translator, continually I must depend on the Holy Spirit and the solid tools I have at hand, and at the end say, ‘I have done the best I can, Lord. Forgive me for not doing better. Use this to point to Jesus.’

    • Thank you so much for your many years of dedication. If only all translators had such a dedicated heart as yours. Yes, a translation is a tool, and you made the best tool you could, and God can use it for good.

  16. Hi there Dr. Eli, I fully agree with you regarding ‘translation’ and ‘interpretation’. However, I submit to you that ‘existing Doctrine(s)’, ‘commonly accepted beliefs’, and ‘so-called authority’ plays a role in translation-bias. Personally, I find going back to the oldest Scripture sources I can find and simply using multiple Concordances it becomes evident that ‘the Word of YHVH’ as translated may not be correct. Inconsistencies give rise to a suspicion that the ‘Truth in Scripture’ is not always taken as ‘the ultimate Authority’. So ultimately most believers simply accept what they read and are too lazy to think for themselves.

  17. Right now, I long for LITERAL translations of the Hebrew bible, the Greek NT and the Arabic Quran. The interpretation of the translators should be appended only as annotations. Literal translation allows the reader to gradually learn the idioms of the languages. And he/she has the option to freely question the interpretations in the annotations, knowing these are not God’s word!

  18. I have followed the discussion to this point, and want to say that, we need to appreciate the efforts of translators irrespective of what we may call flaws.

  19. Psalm 23:1. The Hebrew says, “Yahweh ro-ee, lo ekh-sar.” The translator has settled it as “Yahweh is my shepherd (therefore) I will not/never lack.” Yet, it could also be translated as a prayer, “Yahweh, my shepherd! May I never lack!” The same applies to much of the Psalms. Yes, the knowledge of the original opens avenues otherwise hidden to the reader of the settled translations. Thanks, Dr Eli, to you and your team. We need knowledge of all the original languages, Hebrew, Greek and Arabic, to reduce inter-faith conflict. But Hebrew is key: its bible is the foundation of others.

    • Thank you for your post, Yahka, and insight. That is a possible reading, but often the Biblical Hebrew modal verb forms will appear in a slightly different form.

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    • Interesting conversation re: translation & interpretation. How is it that most of the Pharisees & Scribes in the time of Jesus got scripture translation & interpretation so wrong by going against Jesus & yet the Word was in their language.

  20. There can be no contradictions in the Bible, whatsoever, otherwise, then the Bible is a false document and is not the word of God. We must not confuse our own difficulties in understanding and harmonising difficult passages of scripture, which is subjective, with objective, real contradictions. God is neither confused nor double faced.

    • I strongly advise against learning through transliteration, but if you insist, I know that theword.net free Bible software has a Bible version called the Hebrew Interpolated Study Bible (HISB) which transliterates the whole Tanakh.

  21. Is it wise to go outside the Bible to look for the meaning of the Bible passage like in the Apocryphal books? Ain’t all scriptures suppose to point us to Christ like John the Baptist did pointing his audience to the Lamb? Love the post Dr.

    • It is wise to learn the culture of the Bible (in order to better understand the Bible) which can be done both from the Bible itself, as well as from extra-biblical literature (including the Apocrypha). Although, it may not be wise to establish theology from non-biblical literature though.

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  22. Simply read the whole Bible as you read any other book right through from verse one of Genesis to the last verse of Revelation, then start again at that the beginning and so on till you die. I’m eighty six and on my fifth or sixth reading.

  23. In college we were taught in our Bible Interpretation class to do these four things in every passage:
    Observation what does it say?
    Interpretation. What does it mean?
    Application What dies it mean to me?
    Correlation. Any other scripture that says the same thing?
    Very good discussion about translation /interpretation.

  24. Dr. Eli, I have studied Hebrew at the university level and I am encouraged by the essays from the IBC. Many of these essays go to the next step in communication, hopefully creating a similar picture in the minds of the recipient as the speaker possesses.

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  25. Studying the original Hebraic/Greek Scripture is very good and useful. However, if one has been filled with the Holy Ghost, then He will teach them exactly what the scripture (KJV in English) says’s. Example: “believe” (John 3:16), means also “commitment”. The Spirit draws Christians toward this, not just original Greek.

      • That is a very common question. To Answer: When stating that the Holy Ghost shall lead God’s people into all truth, we should also be aware that we must try the spirits (1 John 4:1), and search the scriptures to see if a thing is of God ( Acts 17:11).

  26. Dr. Eli, I have been a Bible translator for 70 years with Wycliffe Bible Translators. You have said no truer words about translation being interpretation. Unfortunately, we are imperferct humans, and unconsciously allow some of our own preferences (sometimes good, others not so good) to enter the translated text.

  27. However, there are good proven checks by other scholars to hopefully avoids erroneous interpretations.
    Rather than thinking in terms of word, we must think in terms of the message being communicated: in what situation was it said, what was the relationship between the writer and reader, what language tools wereused.

  28. Interresting comments, the best thing I could read here is the honesty of these translators. May GOD bless you guys, I think this is one of the most important work one can do. Dr Eli, thanks for all this insights, and yes I also have a huge thing about all these “SPIRITFILLED” people. Wonder wich one is inline with GOD’s thoughts. Nevertheless everyone is part of labouring the in vineyard. As for dean of a Bible college hopefully one day I can teach only the truth, in meantime I intergrate it slowly into the doctrines because get rebellious when changes happen.

  29. Busy with an exercise. I focus on conceptual translation. In my case Afrikaans to English. With many English Bibles some translation differences is found which change the understanding of the concept.
    My opinion is what is all good to retrieve from the bible to use. Revive all GOODNESS.

  30. My thanks Dr. Eli for this discussion and to all those that teach and translate. I have a few translations. Can I ask is the NIV a Darwinian translation? As I’ve been brought to understand there are many verse deplete of the ‘Blood of Christ’?

  31. Dr. Eli, I have found the best way to explore translations or interpretations is from the aspect of human communication, i.e. “word pictures.” I understand words, emphasis, and actions during communication produces recall of word pictures in a human’s mind. Since this is the case, different words or actions (cont.)

  32. … in different languages may be necessary to produce the desired “word-picture” in the mind of another. Our ultimate goal should be to grasp the concepts Jesus taught and diligently pursue them with guidance and help from the Holy Spirit. Shalom

  33. I think that just reading the text, even in its original, is an act of interpretation. the only time individuals got the words exactly right was when God inspired the writers of the text. Ever since its been tough.

  34. I speak Spanish and have often had to interpret into English and into Spanish. When I am sneaking to an Argentina audience, I will use a different vocabulary than when I am speaking to a Mexican audience. In Central America, there are different choices.

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